Child Quote 13

I haven’t posted one of these for a while. Mavis and Horace are lovely, but not cute any more and their witty remarks are sophisticated. There is still plenty of opportunity for cute stuff as I work in a primary school but I have to be careful.

This time of year, I imagine in most primary schools, the SATs and assessments are over and the end of the school year is imminent. Teachers and children are tired but there are matters less academic  to focus on, such as concerts, leavers assemblies and school trips.

We also have something called Transition Day. This is a marvellous innovation. There was nothing like it when I was at school. The children all move up to their next class so that they and their new teacher can get to know one another. In year 6 students head off to spend a couple of days in their new secondary school.

Transition
Thanks to University of Nebraska for this image http://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/rso/6187/34608

This is what was happening on the day when I had to swallow my hanky to stifle a guffaw. The teacher explained to the children that, like Superman, they were Super (learning) heroes. They had to think of a super learning name such as Mr Mathematic, and explain what their super power was. Maybe they were super spellers or super multipliers (if you see what I mean. We don’t teach human reproduction until Year 6).  The (learning) bit escaped some, who gave themselves names such as Captain Fantastic but who cared, they were having fun? The children also had to explain on their paper, what their weakness was. Superman had Kryptonite and theirs could be ‘Evil PE’ or whatever.

I don’t often have the chance to work in a class as I usually work one to one, supporting children with Speech and Language or Special Educational needs, so I was enjoying looking over shoulders and chatting about the choices children had made.

This is what made me giggle. In the box entitled ‘Super Power’ a child had written ‘Wondering’ and beside that, in the box entitled ‘Weakness’, she had put ‘Thinking’.

I’m with her there.

Funny thing

We let out our rooms on AirBNB. It has given us a good income and we have met lots of interesting people from all over the world: France, Spain, Germany, China, India, USA, and other places. Sometimes there are language difficulties but in the main they put us to shame with their amazing knowledge of English.

This week we had a lady from Spain. I speak a bit of Spanish but as usual, didn’t need to use it. A couple of nights ago she came down stairs to the kitchen, where Whizz, Mavis and I were eating dinner.

‘What is the name of the Indian?’ she asked, gesturing in the direction of the Indian restaurant a few yards away.

The Haldi.’ I replied, upon which, the girl went upstairs and knocked on the door of the family room. ‘Excuse me, The Haldi,’ she said to the guy from Calcutta, who had rented the room for a few days, ‘Would you mind moving your car?’